7 Ways to Try Out the Tie-Dye Trend

FEB 5, 2020 updated Jul 19, 2021

While resist dyeing techniques have been around for centuries, the modern phrase “tie-dye” was invented in the 1960s and had its last heyday in the ‘90s. Well in case you missed it, the ‘90s are officially back! With that comes a new wave of tie-dye love. Trending color palettes and creative treatments take this trend into the “now”, and we’re loving it on a variety of applications from pillows to wallpaper.

A Wardrobe to Dye For

Growing up, did one of your wardrobe staples consist of a brightly tie-dyed tee? It might be hard to consider tie-dye as part of your closet now but when you adjust the colors from technicolor to toned down, a handmade wardrobe featuring tie-dye prints becomes much more of a possibility. 

Photo: Net-A-Porter
Photo: Spot Pop Fashion

The Nikko Top and Dress is a me-made crowd favorite so when we saw this tie-dye top, it was just the inspo we needed for our very own handmade version. As seen in the photo, try styling your tie-dye tank with light colored bottoms to create a balanced look. If you’re not ready to fully commit to a total tie-dye takeover, simonedesantis’ Large Scale Pink Shibori Squares in Cotton Spandex Jersey or Modern Jersey is just the intro you need. 

Goodbye gray sweatpants, hello colorful comfort! A tie-dye print on Organic Cotton Knit is just the thing to take a pair of Hudson Pants from drab to fab. Try out a monochromatic design like Shibori Green Tie Dyed Tonal to dip your toes into the tie-dye waters.

Photo: Spoonflower
Photo: o cara fashion

While you can’t beat the real thing, digitally printed tie-dye designs help extend the life of your garments. For example, take Meg of Sew Liberated. Featured above in an Organic Cotton Knit Stasia Dress, Meg chose Rustic Indigo Dye to replicate a vintage indigo mudcloth dress that has since become threadbare after years of wearing. Get to know more about Meg in her Me Made May interview.

Ready to make a statement? A Dogwood Denim™ jacket in a colorful tie-dye design like  Quinn Tiedye Cotton Candy is the nod to the ’90s we need. For a more subtle approach to the trend, try a monochrome tie-dye print like Rose Quartz Shibori for a Hampton Denim Jacket.

Tie-Dye in the Home

Tie-dye in your home doesn’t have to mean an oversized tapestry you’d picture hanging in your college dorm room (although we wouldn’t be opposed to it!). The sophisticated approach to a far out design aesthetic is all about your color and styling choices. 

Start off small with a throw pillow. It’s an easy way to test out tie-dye in your living room—aka low commitment, big impact. You can keep your space looking timeless while also adding that pop of pattern your room is missing. We think a two-toned design like theplayfulcrow’s Shibori 26 Subdued Amethyst works great for keeping your colorful addition low-key. For a coordinating collection of throw pillows, take a closer look at Pam’s Shibori Subdued Amethyst collection featuring shibori-inspired designs.

Moving on from the living room to the dining room, let’s talk about table runners. Batik, the Idonesian technique of wax-resist dyeing is a more traditional way to bring tie-dye into your home. Using designs like  ripdntorn’s Batik Purple Aqua Gold Pink across a table runner, you can dress up your table whether it’s for weeknight meals or a weekend dinner party. 

Pro tip: Want to send your dinner guests home with a groovy gift? A set of tie-dye cocktail napkins is an eco-friendly way to show your appreciation. 

To bring in those boho-vibes and #plantgoals, we can’t think of a better way to highlight tie-dye designs than with a DIY planter bag. Sew up a set of three Cypress Cotton Canvas bags in varying sizes (see how to make a mini version here) featuring designs within the same tie-dye color palette to create a focal point in your home.

Tie-Dye Your Spoonflower Fabric

Designs in the Spoonflower Marketplace that have black line drawings on a white background are perfect for adding a layer of tie-dye! We used Spoonflower’s Cotton Poplin and Cotton Lawn to make bandanas for the whole family. But it doesn’t stop at bandanas! You could use your fabric to create many projects on the blog like scrunchies, fanny packs and wall hangings. Check out the post for more ideas!

Spoonflower Marketing team member Kristina and her niece with matching tie dye bandanas

Whether you’re dyeing the fabric at home or choosing a digitally printed replication, one thing is for sure—there’s now more ways than ever to incorporate tie-dye into your everyday. 

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